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    ARREA-Systems: Queue email

    20 hours 28 minutes ago
    Queue email Arrea Systems Mon, 07/15/2019 - 11:51

     

    When sending email from your application, using queuing process can reduce the application response time and increase speed.

    By sending the message to queue instead of sending directly at the end of server response, you may achieve better user experience. Once messages are in queue, you just need a scheduled cron task to initiate scheduled email sending.

    How ?

    Queuing is simple in Drupal 8

    aleksip.net: A new approach for a new Pattern Lab

    3 days 7 hours ago
    The PHP version of Pattern Lab has been a trusty tool for a long time, especially for many of us working with Twig and component-based theming for Drupal. However, ever since a decision was made to focus development efforts on Pattern Lab Node, it has been clear that it would eventually become necessary to switch from using the PHP version to using the Node version.

    DrupalEasy: Demystifying drupal-core-require-dev and drupal-core-strict in the "Drupal Composer/Drupal Project" Composer template

    3 days 16 hours ago

    If you build Drupal 8 sites using the Drupal Composer/Drupal Project Composer template (DCDP), then you've likely noticed the development dependency webflo/drupal-core-require-dev. If you're like me, you probably didn't give it much thought the first 20 or 30 times you used the template. 

    After a while though, I started to dig deeper into the details of DCDP, wanting to be able to understand exactly how it worked and what customizations I may want to make. DCDP was really my first real exposure to Composer, and the more I learned, the more I wanted to learn (as is often the case). My curiosity led me to this drupal-core-require-dev rabbit hole.

    Some background

    First, let's level-set ourselves - when you run either "composer install" or "composer create-project" (which is actually calling "composer install" as well) without the "--no-dev" switch, Composer will install all dependencies listed in your composer.json file in both the "require" and "require-dev" sections (as well as dependencies of dependencies). If you take a look at DCDP, you'll notice that in the "require-dev" section, there is one entry: webflo/drupal-core-require-dev. 

    So, as most folks who start Drupal 8 projects using the recommended DCDP command listed in the README (composer create-project drupal-composer/drupal-project:8.x-dev some-dir --no-interaction), Composer is installing everything in the "require" and "require-dev" sections - including webflo/drupal-core-require-dev.

    What exactly is webflo/drupal-core-require-dev? Well, it is a "virtual" dependency - meaning it doesn't include any code, rather it just includes a composer.json file that specifies the specific versions of Drupal core development ("require-dev") dependencies that are used to run Drupal core tests. The interesting (and sometimes problematic bit) is that webflo/drupal-core-require-dev doesn't specify any versions for non-development ("require") dependencies. If you take a look at Drupal core's composer.json file, you'll see that for the most part, specific versions of dependencies aren't specified - rather a range is. 

    This leads to the situation where a project built with webflo/drupal-core-require-dev could have different dependency versions (as long as they adhere to the version constraints is Drupal core's composer.json) than what comes with Drupal core if you had just downloaded it from drupal.org.

    For example, if on the date version 8.7.0 of Drupal core was released one of the development dependencies was at version 1.3.1, then that is the version that is provided with Drupal core 8.7.0 downloaded from drupal.org regardless of when you download it. But, when using the DCDP as-is, if since the release of Drupal core 8.7.0 the development dependency was updated to 1.3.2, then when the project is installed using "composer create-project", your project will be using version 1.3.2 of the dependency. While this seems minor, it has led to some issues

    Also - be aware that there are different versions of webflo/drupal-core-require-dev for every minor version of Drupal core. So, if you're updating your site from Drupal core 8.6.x to 8.7.x, then you must also update to webflo/drupal-core-require-dev to 8.7 as well. This is the reason the update command for DCDP includes webflo/drupal-core-require-strict: composer update drupal/core webflo/drupal-core-require-dev "symfony/*" --with-dependencies

    After learning this, I had an obvious question: what's the advantage of having Composer install updated versions of Drupal core dependencies? The only thing I found was that if you're a core or contrib developer, then it would be useful to know if your code breaks using updated dependencies. I'm hard-pressed to think of another reason when this makes sense. For most Drupal 8 projects, I think it would be beneficial to use the exact dependencies that the particular version of Drupal core ships with. This way, we can be 100% certain that our project has the same dependency versions that the community's testing infrastructure has validated for the particular version. Luckily, that's what webflo/drupal-core-strict is for. 

    It works almost the exact same way as webflo/drupal-core-require-dev except that it includes exact versions for all dependencies of Drupal core - for both development ("require-dev") and non-development ("require") packages. The exact versions are the ones that have been tested and are included in the "official" version of Drupal core (for each minor version) downloadable from drupal.org. Like webflo/drupal-core-require-dev, there is a minor version of webflo/drupal-core-strict for each minor version of Drupal core.

    So, why does DCDP use webflo/drupal-core-require-dev? Well, there's some debate about if it should or not. 

    As a side-note, if you host on Pantheon, and use their Pantheon-flavored version of DCDP, then you're probably already using webflo/drupal-core-strict.

    Starting a project with DCDP using webflo/drupal-core-strict

    First, the bad news - if you want to start a new project using webflo/drupal-core-strict, you can't use DCDP out-of-the-(virtual)-box. But, there's a couple of possibilities. At first glance, it seems that you could fork DCDP, make the relevant change to webflo/drupal-core-strict in the composer.json file, then use "composer create-project" on your fork. But, this would also require posting your fork on Packagist (which is discouraged), updating your fork's README (for the create-project and update commands) as well as keeping your fork up-to-date with any DCDP updates. I wouldn't recommend this method.

    A better option is to use the "--no-install" option of Composer's "create-project" command:

    1.  Use the recommended command on the DCDP page, but add a "--no-install" at the end of it:

    composer create-project drupal-composer/drupal-project:8.x-dev some-dir --no-interaction --no-install

    This will download DCDP to your local, but not install dependencies. 

    2.  Edit the composer.json file with:

    • New project name
    • New project description
    • Remove "webflo/drupal-core-require-dev" from the "require-dev" section
    • Add "webflo/drupal-core-strict": "^8.7.0", to the "require" section (ensure the version matches drupal/core).
    • Change the version requirement for drupal/console to: "drupal/console": "^1.0", (to avoid version conflicts)
    • Change the version requirement for drush/drush to: "drush/drush": "^9.0", (to avoid version conflicts)
    • Remove "composer/installers" from the "require" section (it is already specified in webflo/drupal-core-strict). 

    3.  Run "composer install". 

    You'll need to remember that when you want to update Drupal core, you'll want to use the following command (instead of what is in the DCDP README):

    composer update drupal/core webflo/drupal-core-strict "symfony/*" --with-dependencies

    If you're not crazy about either of these two options, there is a third (future?) - leave a comment on this issue and ask for webflo/drupal-core-strict to be used in DCDP. 

    Change an existing project from webflo/drupal-core-require-dev to webflo/drupal-core-strict

    What if you already have a project based on DCDP and you want to change it from using webflo/drupal-core-require-dev to webflo/drupal-core-strict? Here's some possible ways of doing it:

    As always, to be safe, please test things like this on a copy of your project.

    Method one: manually downgrade dependencies

    This is definitely a tedious process. It involves first removing webflo/drupal-core-require-dev using:

    composer remove webflo/drupal-core-require-dev

    Then, attempt to require drupal-core-strict:

    composer require webflo/drupal-core-strict:^8.7.0

    Depending on a number of factors you're likely to get a bunch of "Your requirements could not be resolved to an installable set of packages." messages. How many you get is mostly a result of the length of time since the previous minor release of Drupal core - the longer it has been, the more dependencies have probably been updated. For each dependency listed, you'll need to downgrade it using something like:

    composer require symfony/yaml:3.4.26

    What is happening is that webflo/drupal-core-require-dev allows dependencies to get upgraded outside of the Drupal core release timeline, while webflo/drupal-core-strict does not. So, you'll need to downgrade dependencies that have been updated. You'll have to do it one-at-a-time - try requiring webflo/drupal-core-strict, see the error message, downgrade the offending dependency, then repeat. In some cases, it isn't immediately obvious which dependency needs to be downgraded, or which version it needs to be downgraded to, so be prepared to use the "composer depends" command a few times. 

    Eventually, requiring webflo/drupal-core-strict will succeed and you'll know that you're done.

    There is one major downside to this method though - by requiring specific versions of each dependency, the versions are effectively pinned in the composer.json file. So, the next time you update Drupal core (and webflo/drupal-core-strict), these specific version constraints will conflict with the updated webflo/drupal-core-strict. One solution would be to remove all of these dependencies from the "require" section of your composer.json file. 

    Method two: rebuilding your codebase

    If Method one is tedious and precise, then this method is more of a (less tedious) big hammer. Depending on the complexity of your codebase, this might be a better option for simpler projects. In short, make a copy of your composer.json (for reference), then use "composer remove" to remove dependencies on drupal/core, webflo/drupal-core-require-dev, and anything that depends on them. Then, use "composer require" to add back drupal/core and webflo/drupal-core-strict: 

    composer require webflo/drupal-core-strict:^8.7.0 drupal/core:^8.7.0

    Then, add back (composer require) all the dependencies you had to remove. Be sure to add back the same versions of each dependency (this includes Drupal profiles, modules, and themes!) to end up where you were when you started. Once everything is back, then you'll probably want to "relax" the version constraints of your dependencies in your composer.json by adding a "^". For example, if you re-add a contrib module using:

    composer require drupal/pathauto:8.1.3

    Then in the "require section" of your composer.json you'll have:

    "drupal/pathauto": "8.1.3",

    This will prevent drupal/pathauto from being updated. So, you'll want to change this to:

    "drupal/pathauto": "^8.1.3", Method three: delete and update

    While researching this topic, I posted an issue in the webflow/drupal-core-require-dev queue and Greg Anderson was kind enough to offer another method:

    [One] solution is to modify your composer.json file, attach the same version limit to drupal/core and drupal-core-strict (e.g. ^8.7.3) to limit what [composer update] needs to look at, and then [delete] both your composer.lock and your vendor directory and run "composer update".

    One caveat about this method is that it will update everything. Any outstanding dependency updates (including Drupal profiles, modules, and themes) will be applied (unless you constrain them in your composer.json). Here's what Greg suggests:

    • Pin your contrib modules that are not updated to an exact version in composer.json.
    • Remove vendor and composer.lock, add webflo/drupal-core-strict [to your composer.json], and generate a new lock file [with "composer update"].
    • Remove the pins of your contrib modules in your composer.json by adding ^ [similar to the example in the previous method.]
    • Run composer update --lock
    Method four: ???

    Is there an easier way to do this? If so, I'd love to hear about it. Let me know in a comment below.

    Which to use?

    So which one should you use? If all your contrib projects are up-to-date, then I'd go with Method 3. If not, then I'd recommend Method 2 or 3 depending on which you're more comfortable with.

    The future

    Of course, in the future, much of this may be moot (for new projects, at least), as there is an active effort to bring an official version of DCDP to Drupal, including a new scaffolding dependency (committed to drupal/core on July 10, 2019!) and something akin to drupal-core-require-dev and drupal-core-strict. To find out more, check out the Composer Support in Core Initiative

    Thanks to Greg Anderson, one of the Composer in Core Initiative coordinators, for his input and review of this article.

    Drupal Association blog: Global Training Days events from June 2019

    4 days 6 hours ago

    Drupal creates growth of local communities when training events inspire new Drupalers to grow their skills and get involved in the project. This June, events occurred in Sydney, Brisbane, Tokyo, New York City, Nuevo León, and online. Here's the summary from a few of the host trainers:

    Kazu Hodota (kazu.hodota), in Tokyo:

    "We had Drupal Global Training Day Tokyo on June 29, 2019 and this is a short report. 10 people registered, and 8 people with 1 Skype user joined GTD Tokyo. One person is a Drupal end user, seven are Web business SI, which included three first time Drupalers. Two were evaluating Drupal API functions, for example importing JSON data to Drupal content types, IoT system of digital signage applications with JavaScript Server side applications with Drupal.

    I think API application user will be growing near future!"

    Drupal global training day Tokyo 2019 June 29 start now @cmslabo #drupal #drupalGTD #learningdrupal pic.twitter.com/4fLqoB678L

    — cmslabo (@cmslabo) June 29, 2019

    Angel GHR (angel.garza), in Monterrey:

    "The Drupal Global Training Days event in Monterrey, Mexico was hosted inside UANL FIME for two days. On June 28, we had conferences starting with Drupal Introduction and all the way to Reacting Drupal, receiving a little over 30 people in the conference and 15 presenters.


    Learning Drupal in Monterrey. Photo by Angel Garza.

    On June 29, we had two concurrent workshops, the basic one where we presented Drupal from the basic installation, configuration and walkthrough the platform, this workshop had 7 people in it and 6 presenters and the advanced one where we presented Progressively Decoupled Drupal 8 with React and Gatsby and had 6 people in the workshop and 6 presenters.We got a really positive feedback by both the participants and the school in which we hosted the event, getting people interested in future events and open to learn more about Drupal."

    David Needham (davidneedham), online training for Pantheon:

    "We had a great turnout at the Getting Started with Drupal 8 workshop Pantheon ran on June 28th of Global Training Day with around 200 students attending at once. We recorded the training last time we ran it and published it (feel free to run through it yourself or pass it along to others). This is material that we regularly run in-person at camps and online for GTD. Want to run it at your next event in your own community? Reach out to me directly for more information or fill out the form at https://pantheon.io/trainers."

    Interested in helping in the Global Training Days initiative?

    We are looking for more volunteers across the Drupal community to organize more GTD events and more local training events. Do reach out to the GTD group / Slack and join a community of passionate training organizers across the world. You would find resources and other people who can help you with organizing your training event. You can also reach out to Anoop John (anoopjohn) if you have questions.

    To get involved in Global Training Days, visit the group's event list and add your event.

    Drupal Atlanta Medium Publication: DrupalCamp Atlanta: Founder of Gatsby Kyle Mathews, Session Proposals Due, July 12

    4 days 8 hours ago
    On September 12–14, at Hilton Garden Inn Atlanta-BuckheadKyle Mathews, 2019 DrupalCamp Atlanta KeynoteWelcome, Kyle Mathews!

    This year, DrupalCamp Atlanta is honored to welcome Kyle Mathews as our keynote speaker, creator of the open source project Gatsby. Gatsby was a hot topic at DrupalCon this year, and we’re ready to dive into the software at DrupalCamp this September.

    Follow Kyle on Twitter and Github.

    Hurry Call for Proposals Due July 12!

    Session submissions are now open for DrupalCamp Atlanta 2019! With Kyle as our keynote, we’re interested to see how others are combining Drupal and Gatsby. In addition, we’re also accepting sessions in the following tracks:

    • Beginner
    • Design, Theming, and Usability
    • Development and Performance
    • Site Building
    • Business Leadership
    • Education and Training

    Each session is 40 minutes with 10 minutes for Q&A. Each room will be set classroom style and will have a projection screen and with in house audio.

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    Be sure to grab your early bird tix for #DCATL before 8/12! September will be here before you know it! https://t.co/7vKzR83USk

     — @DrupalCamp_ATL

    function notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}Trainings

    In addition to 50-minute sessions, we’re also looking for volunteer trainers for our full day of trainings on Thursday (9/12) and a half day on Friday (9/13). Training sessions can range across all experience levels. You can submit your call for training here.

    Co-Present with Your Clients

    One of our goals for this year’s camp was to increase the number of case studies. We encourage web development companies and units to connect with their clients to co-present a session at this year’s DCATL.

    We see this as an opportunity to re-engage with a client by highlighting the great work you have done together all while introducing them to the awesome Drupal community we have. So, reach out to some of our clients and propose a presentation today!

    SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL HERE

    DrupalCamp Atlanta: Founder of Gatsby Kyle Mathews, Session Proposals Due, July 12 was originally published in Drupal Atlanta on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

    Drupal Association blog: Call for participation: Drupal Business Survey 2019

    4 days 9 hours ago

    This is the fourth time that the Drupal business Survey has been launched and every year it provides a wealth of information about the use of Drupal. With the survey, the organisers hope to gain more insight into key issues that agency leaders all over the world encounter. The responses will be used to generate anonymized, aggregate report about the state of the Drupal business ecosystem. The results and insights of this survey will be officially published on Drupal.org and presented on Tuesday, October 29, 2019, at the annual Drupal CEO Dinner during DrupalCon Amsterdam.

    Focus on Drupal landscape and Drupal 9

    The 2019 edition of the survey focuses, among other things, on the development of the Drupal landscape. What are the expectations towards Drupal 9? But it also focuses on what developments you hope to see with regard to Drupal in the coming years.

    Contribute to the Drupal project by participating in this Drupal Business Survey

    By completing the survey, you contribute to Drupal. Your input is therefore of great value!

    Take the Drupal Business Survey here: http://bit.ly/DrupalBusinessSurvey2019

    Texas Creative: New Drupal Module: Existing Values Autocomplete Widget

    4 days 9 hours ago

    Providing the content creator a field with a list of values to choose from is a common requirement when building a Drupal site. It’s also something that can be achieved in a variety of ways, each having pros and cons to the approach. Texas Creative’s web team has developed a module that we believe fills a missing gap in this type of field called Existing Values Autocomplete Widget.

    In the following analysis, we will discuss each possible approach, the use case for it, along with an example. The final approach includes using our new module. 

    Read More

    Promet Source: Drupal 9: What You Need to Know Now

    5 days 1 hour ago
    The countdown for the June 2020 Drupal 9 release has begun. As the Drupal community awaits this next big thing, here are the two burning questions on the minds of Drupal Devotees: 

    Palantir: OSCON 2019: Open@Amazon

    5 days 3 hours ago
    OSCON 2019: Open@Amazon July 16th, 2019 brandt Wed, 07/10/2019 - 16:07 Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon Open@Amazon (official site)

    Open source looks very different now compared to 20 years ago, and with such a vast community of developers, it is difficult to define the exact role of a “good” open source citizen.

    Palantir is thrilled to be participating in Keeping Open Source Open -- a panel including CEO, Tiffany Farriss for a spirited discussion on open source strategy and the future of open source.

    Other panelists include Zaheda Bhorat (Amazon Web Services) and Matt Asay (Adobe). The panel will air some of the strongest opinions on Twitter.

    • Time: 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
    • Location: F150/151

     

    Wed, 07/10/2019 - 12:00

    Kanopi Studios: Mukurtu CMS: Designed in partnership with indigenous people to preserve cultural heritage

    5 days 4 hours ago

    Kanopi Studios is honored to have contributed to Mukrutu, a project that offers a powerful example of the importance of putting inclusivity, cultural sensitivity, and user needs at the center of design and development so that technology can be used as a force for good. 

    What is Mukurtu?

    Mukurtu  (MOOK-oo-too) is a free content management system built with Drupal that helps indigenous communities manage, share, and exchange their heritage in culturally relevant and ethically-minded ways.

    “Mukurtu” is a Warumungu word for safe keeping place, a name chosen in 2007 when Warumungu community members collaborated with developers and scholars on the first iteration of the platform to produce the Mukurtu Wumpurrarni-kari Archive.

    Surviving cultures risk being drowned out or forgotten by modern society due to dwindling numbers, resources, and legal claim to land and heritage. By sharing their voices, indigenous cultures can preserve their history and way of life, educate others, and seek much-needed support. But by doing so, they run the risk of losing control and ownership of the narrative. The Mukurtu project helps to solve that problem. Mukurtu was created to allow indigenous cultures to share their heritage on their own terms, eliminating the potential for exploitation or misrepresentation. 

    The power of Mukurtu comes from its complex and layered permission system that goes far beyond the capabilities of traditional content management systems. The system is purpose-built to allow indigenous people to maintain control over how information is shared, who they share it with, and how it can be used.

    Mukurtu and Kanopi Studios

    As the program expanded, Kanopi Studios joined the Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation at Washington State University and CoDA as a development partner. Kanopi led a research-guided approach that included focus groups and surveys with users to inform the project’s technical strategy and development.

    Since Mukurtu’s original release, Kanopi has played a lead role in development, adding features based on user requests and ensuring that the system remains easy to use, secure, and scalable. New features include an improved  mobile experience and robust collaboration capabilities with a mobile app coming soon that will allow users to browse and add content from the field, even while offline. 

    Kanopi Studios also works directly with clients who want to use Mukurtu, but need to enhance the system to meet unique needs. Custom development examples include a site to help relocate indigenous people in Kivalina, Alaska, another to share the voices of Amiskwaciy people in Edmonton, Canada, and one of our earliest projects with Washington State University.

    How Mukurtu can support indigenous communities 

    Mukurtu was built to be flexible enough to support diverse communities while remaining easy enough that non-technical users can add and update content and permissions.

    Core features include:

      • Traditional knowledge labels allow communities to add labels to content that describe how that content can be accessed, used and circulated, and to whom it needs to be attributed.
      • Cultural protocols allow for finely-grained content access settings that can be customized on an ongoing basis to meet the needs and values of each community, from wide open, to restricted at the individual level. 
      • Community records allow multiple ways to store information about cultural heritage so critical details and diverse perspectives can be maintained. 
      • Data integrity uses file hashes to ensure that files are not tampered with, ensuring that content remains intact over time.
      • Dictionary helps indigenous communities preserve their language, complete with translations, definitions, pronunciations, audio recordings, and other media
      • Collaboration tools allow site members to share events on group calendars and engage in threaded discussions.
      • Unit plans and lessons give educators and students a platform to engage in online and field learning through a Mukurtu site.

    Indigenous communities across the globe use Mukurtu to record, preserve, and share their heritage, including the Plateau Peoples’ Web Portal, Passamaquoddy People, Catawba Indian Nation Archives, and many more. 

    Impacting our future

    While indigenous people benefit from sharing their stories, modern society has much to learn from their cultures as well, from our relationship to the land in a time when climate change threatens us all, to staying connected during this time of individualism and political divide. We’re proud to continue expanding Mukurtu as a platform for telling these important stories and hope they will help us build a stronger future for everyone.

    Getting started with Mukurtu

    If you have technical support and hosting available, you can download Mukurtu on Github and begin using it for free. For clients who need technical support additional customization of Mukurtu, contact us. We’d love to help.   

    The post Mukurtu CMS: Designed in partnership with indigenous people to preserve cultural heritage appeared first on Kanopi Studios.

    Drupal In the News: Splash Awards announce new brand to support international open source awards

    5 days 7 hours ago

    AMSTERDAM July 10 2019 

    The Splash Awards celebrate the best Drupal projects around the world by putting brands and agencies using Drupal center stage. Organized in different regions by local Drupal communities, the Splash Awards have become noteworthy to both insiders and outsiders of the Drupal community. With more and more countries organizing their own Splash Awards and the second edition of the International Splash Awards taking place at DrupalCon Amsterdam in October 2019, establishing a solid and open source brand is imperative. That is why the organisation introduced its new brand this week.

    In 2014, the first Splash Awards was organized in Amsterdam. While several internet awards were already on the marketing-radar of agencies and brands alike, none had the open source characteristics that our community is accustomed to. Moreover, the need for Drupal to have a hallmark award of its own was evident. This put Drupal further on the map of journalists and media as well as potential Drupal users, highlighting Drupal’s many showcases. Equally important, it puts brands using Drupal center stage and welcomes them (further) into the Drupal community. 

    Open Source Awards

    True to its open source nature, the Splash Awards were adopted by volunteers from other Drupal communities and organized in various countries. In 2018 the first European Splash Awards was organized during Drupal Europe in Darmstadt, Germany. This opened the Splash Awards to the European Drupal community attending the event. In April 2019 the first International Splash Awards, targetting a global audience, took place in Seattle during the largest Drupal event in the world, DrupalCon. 

    Inclusive

    In order to serve as a strong and sustainable Drupal showcase platform, the Splash Awards brand needed a consistent and future proof brand. Flexibility, inclusiveness and open source were key in designing the brand, allowing cultures and regions to adopt and start organizing their own Splash Awards. The new brand  also offers flexibility to adapt to regional needs. The open source brand kit will help communities in organizing their own Splash Awards and at the same time it ensures consistency and recognition both inside and outside the Drupal community. 

    DrupalCon Amsterdam

    The volunteers team involved in the rebranding will also organize the next international Splash Awards during DrupalCon Amsterdam. The awards will take place on the first evening on Monday October 28th 2019. DrupalCon is the biggest Drupal conference in the world, having over 2000 Drupal professionals and users attending. The team works in conjunction with the Drupal Association and Kuoni, the organizations behind DrupalCon. 

    With the Splash Awards gaining momentum, it has the unique opportunity to put Drupal in front of new business audiences. Brands  using Drupal proudly stand testimony to others about what a great digital experience platform they have, backed by a professional and passionate community. Drupal developers, agencies and brands can all take pride in winning this prestigious award, built on open source values and celebrating.

    Find out more at https://www.drupal.org/community/splash-awards and splashawards.org (new website will relaunch on the coming weeks).

    For more information please contact:

    Imre Gmelig Meijling (NL)
    Baddy Sonja Breidert (DE)
    Jeroen van den Berg (NL)
    Nick Veenhog (BE)
    Or hello@splashawards.org

    Drupal Association blog: Elevating a diverse group of leaders

    5 days 8 hours ago

    If you want to attract a diverse group of contributors, you have to first show there is a path for a diverse group of people to become leaders -- and providing financial support is a key part of that path.

    At the Drupal Association, we believe one of the most positive ways to elevate community members to leadership is through the Drupal Association Board. Board members have an extraordinary opportunity to drive forward the mission and vision of the Drupal Association, and our programs which support the Drupal project, and to ensure that we consider our community in all its diversity.

    The board has always had a policy of providing financial support to those members (community elected or otherwise) who cannot afford the cost of travel to board events. At the same time, we do ask that those board members who do have the ability to support themselves to do so, particularly if they have a sponsoring organization in the Drupal ecosystem. However, we've realized that this policy is not well documented. This has meant that some excellent candidates may have previously held back from self-nomination for financial reasons. Today, we change that.

    To everyone considering running for the community elected board position please don't let finances be a barrier to your self-nomination for the board. We'd love to have you join us and we're committed to making it achievable for you regardless of your financial situation.

    Bay Area Drupal Camp: Registration is open for BADCamp 2019

    5 days 10 hours ago
    Registration is open for BADCamp 2019 Bay Area Drupal Camp (BADCamp) -- is an annual celebration of open-source software in Berkeley, California. Join us this October 2-5, 2019 for our 13th year orbiting the sun. Four days of talks, training classes, summits, contributions and socials with some of the brightest minds from all over the planet! volkswagenchick Wed, 07/10/2019 - 13:29 Drupal Planet

    Web Wash: Getting Start with Layout Builder in Drupal 8

    5 days 11 hours ago

    The Layout Builder module allows you to customize the design of the entity such as content types, vocabularies, etc… by offering a new drag-and-drop interface. The new interface uses your front-end theme and it offers a proper preview of the actual content which will be used.

    This makes it easier to build your layouts because you won’t have to save and then see what it looks like on the front-end, you can preview your changes while building it.

    The module replaces the “Manage display” page with the new layout builder once enabled. Instead of seeing all the fields on the page, you’ll see a “Manage layout” button which redirects you to the layout builder page.

    The best way to learn how to use any module is by using it to build something. So let’s get into it.

    In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use Layout Builder to modify a content type and how to use the module as a page builder (this is my favorite).

    Eelke Blok: Video: The State of Drupal 9

    5 days 13 hours ago

    At last month's DrupalJam XL in Utrecht, the Netherlands, I gave Gabor Hojtsy's presentation on the state of Drupal 9. It was recorded - thanks DrupalJam organization! - so here is the video. You might also want to view Gabor's own presentation from DrupalCamp Belarus.

    You'll need to turn up the audio, because it seems that it was recorded using the camera, not the fancy microphone I'm wearing.

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  • Dries

    Acquia's new India office

    2 weeks 3 days ago

    This week, Acquia announced the opening of its new office in Pune, India, which extends our presence in the Asia Pacific region. In addition to Pune, we already have offices in Australia and Japan.

    I've made several trips to India in recent years, and have experienced not only Drupal's fast growth, but also the contagious excitement and passion for Drupal from the people I've met there.

    While I wasn't able to personally attend the opening of our new office, I'm looking forward to visiting the Pune office soon.

    For now, here are a few pictures from our grand opening celebration:

    Dries

    Scrambling in Snowdonia

    2 weeks 6 days ago

    At the end of last week, Klaas (one of my best friends) and I drove to from Belgium to Wales dead-set on scrambling up Tryfan's North Ridge and hiking the Ogwen Valley in Snowdonia.

    Scrambling means hiking up steep, rocky terrain using your hands, without the need for ropes or any other kind of protection. It's something between hiking and rock climbing.

    Tryfan's North Ridge silhouette next to lake Lyn Ogwen.

    17 people died on Tryfan the past 30 years, and 516 parties had to be rescued. While the scrambling on Tryfan is rarely technically challenging, it can be dangerous and difficult at times (video of Klaas scrambling), especially when carrying heavy backpacks. Tryfan shouldn't be taken lightly.

    It took us five hours to make it to the top — and it's taking me four days to recover so far. After we reached the top, we descended a few hundred meters and found a patch of grass where we could set up our tent.

    Our campsite on a ridge on the back of Tryfan. The views were spectacular.

    Carrying those heavy backpacks paid off not only because we were able to bring our camping supplies but also because Klaas carried up a steak dinner with cocktails — a late birthday surprise for my 40th birthday. Yes, you read that correctly: a steak dinner with cocktails on top of a mountain! It was a real treat!

    During dinner, the weather started to turn; dark clouds came in and it started to rain. By night time the temperature had dropped to 2 degrees Celsius (35 degrees Fahrenheit). Fortunately, we were prepared and had hauled not only a tent and a steak dinner up the mountain, but also warm clothing.

    The temperatures swung from 20ºC (68ºF) during the day time to 2ºC (35ºF) during night time. In the evenings, we were forced to put on warm clothes and layer up.

    What didn't go so well was that my brand new sleeping pad had a leak and I didn't bring a repair kit. Although, sleeping on the ground wasn't so bad. The next morning, when we opened our tent, we were greeted not only by an amazing view, but also by friendly sheep.

    The next two days, we hiked through the Ogwen Valley. Its wide glacial valley is surrounded by soaring mountains and is incredibly beautiful.

    After three days of hiking we made it back to the base of Tryfan where it all started. We felt a big sense of accomplishment.

    Selfie taken with Klaas' iPhone 8. Me pointing to the Tryfan's North Ridge where our hike began just three days earlier.

    We hadn't taken a shower in four days, so we definitely started to become aware of each other's smell. As soon as we got to Klaas' Volkswagen California (campervan), we showered in the parking lot, behind the car. I ended up washing my armpits four times, once for each day I didn't shower.

    For more photos, check out my photo album.

    Dries

    Announcing a private beta of Acquia Content Cloud

    3 weeks 4 days ago

    Earlier this week at our Acquia Engage conference in London, Acquia announced a new product called "Content Cloud", a headless, SaaS-based content-as-a-service solution built on Drupal.

    Years ago, we heard that organizations wanted to:

    • Create content that is easy to re-use across different channels, such as websites and mobile applications, email, digital screens, and more.

    • Use a content management system with a modern web service API that allows them to use their favorite front-end framework (e.g. React, Angular, Vue.js, etc) to build websites and digital experiences.

    As a result, Acquia spent the last 5+ years helping to improve Drupal's web services capabilities and authoring experience.

    But we also heard that organizations want to:

    • Use single repository to manage all their organization's content.
    • Make it really easy to synchronize content between all their Drupal sites.
    • Manage all content editors from a central place to enable centralized content governance and workflows.
    • Automate the installation, maintenance, and upgrades of their Drupal-based content repository.

    All of the above becomes even more important as organizations scale the number of content creators, websites and applications. Many large organizations have to build and maintain hundreds of sites and manage hundreds of content creators.

    So this week, at our European customer conference, we lifted the curtain on Acquia Content Cloud, a new Acquia product built using Drupal. Acquia Content Cloud is a content-as-a-service solution that enables simplified, headless content creation and syndication across multi-channel digital experiences.

    For now, we are launching an early access beta program. If you’re interested in being considered for the beta or want to learn more as Content Cloud moves toward general availability, you can sign up here.

    In time, I plan to write more about Content Cloud, especially as we get closer to its initial release. Until then, you can watch the Acquia Content Cloud teaser video below:

    Dries

    Web personalization made simple: announcing the all-new Acquia Lift

    3 weeks 6 days ago

    Today, we released a new version of Acquia Lift, our web personalization tool.

    In today's world, personalization has become central to the most successful customer experiences. Most organizations know that personalization is no longer optional, but have put it off because it can be too difficult. The new Acquia Lift solves that problem.

    While before, Acquia Lift may have taken a degree of fine-tuning from a developer, the new version simplifies how marketers create and launch website personalization. With the new version, anyone can point, click and personalize content without any code.

    We started working on the new version of Acquia Lift in early 2018, well over a year ago. In the process we interviewed over 50 customers, redesigned the user interface and workflows, and added various new capabilities to make it easier for marketers to run website personalization campaigns. And today, at our European customer conference, Acquia Engage London, we released the new Acquia Lift to the public.

    You can see all of the new features in action in this 5-minute Acquia Lift demo video:

    The new Acquia Lift offers the best web personalization solution in Acquia's history, and definitely the best tool for Drupal.

    Dries
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